Posts

  • Don't let your Agile Coaches run wild

    Robert C. Martin - himself one of the godfathers of the Agile methodology - has coined the term of “code smells”: Code that has certain characteristics that tell you you’re about to get into deep trouble. I propose the following agile smells:

  • The 1MB Club

    The internet of yesteryear has changed - and not for the better. Thankfully, more and more people are realizing this, and deciding to promote using client-side and server-side resources more efficiently again. One of these initiatives is the 1MB club - an exclusive list of websites that use less than 1 megabyte of data of total resources on their page load.

  • The RSS revival

    Google Reader was the most mourned Google product of all times. When it was discontinued back in the day, for many people, RSS as a standard for news aggregiation died with it. For a while, there was no web-based killer app replacement, and slowly, the many organge, wifiesque RSS symbols disappeared, often together with the feeds they tried to advertise.

  • Why I still prefer physical books

    Anyone who has visited me can attest to this: I own a lot of books - one may say too many. People then tend to push me towards ebooks, some are even offended when they sent me a file, and find a printed copy on my desk the day after.

  • NextTrash - CLI tool to show you when the trash comes next

    I made a little thing: Nexttrash: https://github.com/MHohenberg/NextTrash

  • So I got my ACP-100 done

    I have been working as a Jira Administrator for quite some time now. So it was time to get certified.

  • Resurrecting the WizKid

    I was that kid in the late 1980s who dreamed in BASIC (those were nightmares, good ones were in Assembly) and who could list you ten reasons why the Commodore family of homecomputers were superior to IBM compatibles out of his head.

  • dotfiles belong in a repository

    If you are a Unix afficiado like me dotfiles are the little configuration helpers that make the world run just right for you. Often you’ve tweaked them just right for months and months … and getting the system to work such well-oiled again after a crash will be troublesome.

  • meta information for technical articles

    How often have you searched for a fix for a technical problem, found a link, only to find out - often after some unsuccessful cursing - that the text was about version Hammurabi II and the world (and your software) has moved on?

  • A fresh start

    I have been maintaining websites on and off for several years, starting at the web’s infancy in the mid-1990s. In recent years, these websites disappeared because of a variety of reasons, sometimes because I lost interest, sometimes because hosting providers disappeared, often because I lost data. For a while, I worked as an SEO consultant. Eventually, I lost interest in webmastering and writing - stuff became too complicated to “look good” - a metric that at some point in time was important to me. Around the same time, we saw the creation of the framework, often masqueraded as “content management systems”, which - badly designed - became the major way to hand control of your server to some east-european hacker collective. I now see how misguided this overreliance on graphics, on clicks and on the flashy side of the net is.

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